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Author Topic: This is not good news  (Read 4411 times)

Wayne

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« Last Edit: July 31, 2010, 05:39:22 PM by Wayne »
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justin case

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2010, 07:50:58 PM »

its ok we will have teams of human rights lawyers coming to defend our right not to die of a smoking related diesese.
its all lies about them only wanting to defend the rights of terrorists,
just wait we will be ok.
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justin case

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2010, 09:33:47 PM »

they want to kill off vaping before it becomes popular, that scares them and they will ban it, they have to.
the best we can hope for is that they throw us a bone and not ban the import of juice from other countrys.
either way we are going to be relegated to being a tribe of lepers  using strange devices that produce funny vapor.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2010, 09:46:07 PM by justin case »
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Wayne

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2010, 09:55:51 PM »

THats the beauty of the internet. Anything is buyable  so i aint gonna worry about it (for now)
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justin case

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2010, 10:01:18 PM »

maybe janty will fight it in the courts of britain and europe.
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justin case

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2010, 10:12:28 PM »

does this mean we wont be able to buy that wonderful technological wonder the nicorette inhaler,  god how i miss my days with that.
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ZxIRAX

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2010, 03:19:09 PM »

I have been looking for information on the proposed ban from time to time, it really sucks.

I understand why the government are doing it, but they should try to look at the bigger picture and realise more profit/ saving can be made by allowing the sale of e-cigs and e-juice as the number of NHS patients in the UK will decline over the next 10 years due to people moving over to the alternative.

If you remove the e-cig from the mainstream you are essentially sentencing millions to death.. well shaving years off their lives at least.

I just hope that they see sense and realise that this is the safer option, were being taxed on our purchases, what more do they want!

-Jay
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ZxIRAX

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Re: This is not good news
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2010, 03:29:49 PM »

I'm not sure if you guys have seen the latest replies to the linked thread - but there is an article on the FT (for subscribers only) but someone posted the article for all to see. Here it is, it looks like good news for now, at least!

The main parts are:

Quote
The report said: ?There are a number of impact assessments that lack significant analytical rigour, are poorly presented or appear to be produced as an afterthought, seemingly as a means of ?ticking the right boxes? to obtain the necessary approval for a proposed course of action.?

In an interview with the Financial Times, Michael Gibbons, who chairs the RPC, said: ?It may well be that ministers make up their minds without having a sound evidence base, and civil servants are then asked to assess the impact of measures retrospectively.?

Among the problems Mr Gibbons identified were a lack of explanation for regulation, a failure to examine other possible options and an inadequate examination of the costs and benefits of legislating.

Here is the full article:

Quote
By Kiran Stacey

Published: August 6 2010 00:03 | Last updated: August 6 2010 00:03

Ministers are passing badly thought out regulation that has not been properly analysed, according to a report by an independent panel of experts.

In a scathing report, the regulatory policy committee, which advises the business department on new regulations, identified problems in 22 out of the 107 cases it reviewed between December 2009 and May 2010. All the cases looked at arose during the previous government, which created the RPC last October.

The report said: ?There are a number of impact assessments that lack significant analytical rigour, are poorly presented or appear to be produced as an afterthought, seemingly as a means of ?ticking the right boxes? to obtain the necessary approval for a proposed course of action.?

In an interview with the Financial Times, Michael Gibbons, who chairs the RPC, said: ?It may well be that ministers make up their minds without having a sound evidence base, and civil servants are then asked to assess the impact of measures retrospectively.?

Among the problems Mr Gibbons identified were a lack of explanation for regulation, a failure to examine other possible options and an inadequate examination of the costs and benefits of legislating.

One example was a ban on selling cigarettes from vending machines, which was designed to prevent under-18s from buying cigarettes. The committee said the Department of Health had not analysed whether the ban would actually reduce smoking.

That legislation was passed in spite of the committee?s views, which Mr Gibbons? said was a ?concern?. Business groups warned it cast a question mark over how seriously ministers had taken deregulation.

Steve Pointer, of the EEF, the manufacturers? association, said: ?These findings are quite shocking really in a lot of ways. The most damning thing is that the government went ahead in some cases despite the critical opinions. That is really poor and has got to be seen off.?

Vince Cable, the business secretary, has given Mr Gibbons? committee a wider remit and has asked it to scrutinise new legislation before it is formally published. It will advise Mr Cable?s ?star chamber? of ministers, which has the power to block proposed regulations if it considers them too costly or badly designed.

However, some business groups criticised the plans. The Institute of Directors was ?sceptical? of the RPC?s membership, which includes a trade unionist and a consumer champion. ?We question whether a body which has significant trade union and consumer interests in its make-up will really challenge government figures which consistently understate the cost to business of proposed regulations,? it said.

Mr Gibbons defended the group?s membership, saying the make-up showed true independence from government and from business.

Mr Cable also announced on Thursday the implementation of the new ?one-in, one-out? system of monitoring the flow of new red tape from September 1. Mr Gibbons welcomed the prompt implementation of the rule, which he said was a ?genuinely innovative attempt to deal with the otherwise stubborn weight of regulation on the statute books?.

Scrutiny chief seen as robust voice of reason

Michael Gibbons has now spent almost a decade at the heart of government working with ministers on how to improve regulation.

After leaving Powergen, the energy company, in 2002, he went to work for the government?s Better Regulation Task Force.

He became interested in how regulations were developed after seeing what he believed was a heavy-handed government approach to setting gas prices after the energy industry was denationalised.

Mr Gibbons served on the various successor bodies to that task force, in 2007 producing a report for Alistair Darling, then trade secretary, on employment dispute regulations.

In late 2009, he was asked by Lord Mandelson, then business secretary, to chair the regulatory policy committee and keep an eye on how well departments were assessing the impact of their own regulations.

He has earned the respect of ministers and admiration of business groups, who say he has been a robust voice of reason within Whitehall.

When Vince Cable, the business secretary, was looking for a body to scrutinise regulations before publication, his reputation and his experience treading carefully around Whitehall sensitivities made him the ideal candidate.
-Jay
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